I’m going to be honest with you here and tell you that I hate bugs. They scare me. It doesn’t matter how big they are or how small they are, but I will mention that the number of legs definitely doesn’t improve a bug’s cause. Gross.

There is one bug, though, that I actually quite adore. It’s a firefly (or lightning bug, depending on where y’all live!) It’s the only bug I will purposefully catch to say hello to!

Teaching has a lot to do with fireflies. In fact, in my mind, it’s the perfect analogy.

Sometimes, we as educators are doing all that we can to be the best teacher we can be. In our classrooms, we make personal connections, we provide differentiation, and we give formative assessments. We plan projects, we think of creative active learning, and we do all we can to be involved in extra curricular activities too.

Yet, if you’re anything like me, you’ve shut your door at the end of the day, exhausted, and to be honest, didn’t always feel like you were making the difference you wanted to. Sometimes it’s in student learning, building classroom culture, or your involvement in the school as a whole. You didn’t feel it because you couldn’t see your impact at that particular time.

Here comes the analogy. Because fireflies are nocturnal, they rest during the day. But, they’re still there. As it turns to dark, we see the magic. The evening sky reveals a crowd of flashing little nightlights, a glimmer of hope after a long summer day. Their light reminds me that sometimes we can’t always see the impact we make as teachers, yet it’s always there.

When you see a firefly this summer, consider sending off a good wish. A wish for your impact during the next school to be evident to you, regardless in the light or the dark. A wish for your confidence to never cease!

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